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Ed on the social implications that THE DIFFERENT MALFORMATIONS MIGHT CARRY THAN different malformations might carry than any kind of scientific classificationChapter twelve brings the ABCC up to date and shows evidence of its legacy in Hiroshima The ABCC changed its name to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation or RERF RERF at the time of publication was predominantly a Japanese organization by virtue of its or RERF RERF at the time of publication was predominantly a Japanese organization by virtue of its sources and the composition of its primary scientists although Americans were still very active in the research there Suffering Made Real American Science and the Survivors at Hiroshima is a very well researched book that includes various primary and secondary sources in both English and Japanese The primary resources include a plethora of correspondence government documents diaries pamphlets magazines and pictures Lindee utilized numerous archives like the National Medical Library in Bethesda Maryland the Archives of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington DC the Archives of the Houston Academy of Medicine at the Texas Medical Center in Houston Texas the Bentley Historical Library in Ann Arbor Michigan and the Department of Energy Archives in Germantown Maryland just to name a ew She also draws Mom, They're Teasing Me: Helping Your Child Solve Social Problems from many other works on the subject These sources helped Lindee in her construction of the ABCC s storyrom the American scientists perspective which is pivotal to her thesis about how there has been and can be no uantitative evidence to represent the suffering of the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki The book could have been enhanced if she would have included sources that offered the outsiders view of the ABCC This would have urther legitimatized her argument Lindee exhibits a clear bias in her book against certain elements of the ABCC as an institution She did not per se out right condemn or even criticize any component of ABCC policy directly but she voiced her opinion against the use of nuclear weapons at the end of her book in retrospect which lead to a pejorative connotation of the decision to use the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki This placed a slant on the interpretation of the ABCC role and responsibility to the Japanese people The author presented a airly convincing argument that could have been improved upon by adding perspectives and limiting bias in the conclusion however Lindee still managed to deliver a very useful and informative book that offers a resh thesis which is adeuately supported She presented a very well researched work that deals with the conseuences of World War II in a humanistic sense even though her book ocused on an organization committed to scientific research Suffering Made Real American Science and the Survivors at Hiroshima is a book that can demonstrate the legacy of World War II in the context of the legacy of the survivors of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki via the story of the ABC. Ical treatment to the survivors Through a detailed examination of ABCC policies archival materials the minutes of committee meetings newspaper accounts and interviews with ABCC scientists Lindee explores how political and cultural interests were reflected in the day to day operations of this controversial research programSet against a period of conflicting views of nuclear weapons and nuclear power Suffering Made Real Live Bait follows the course of a politically charged research program and reveals in detail how politics and cultural values can shape the conduct results and uses of scien. Ifficult to come by Clearlyunding needed to be increased in order No Strings Attached for the ABCC to conduct any meaningful studiesThe justificationor the genetics program was to reassure to public that radiation rom the atomic bombs had not program was to reassure to public that radiation rom the atomic bombs had not a generation of heavily mutated children However William J Schull an ABCC geneticist noted that the scientific community could not totally rule out this possible catastrophe given the available experimental evidence The idea of catastrophic mutations were perpetuated when a 1949 magazine article that warned of possible disfiguration being passed down genetically as a conseuence of the atomic bombs The second part of the book which includes chapters Northern California: A History and Guide - From Napa to Eureka five through eight was about the management of the ABCC The topics rangedrom the daily operations between the US scientists Japanese scientists midwives and other Japanese staff the relationship between Washington and the ABCC to the No Treatment Policy and the ABCC s public relations in both Japan and the US Managing the ABCC was a difficult task that was plagued by issues in both Japan and Washington There was a significant dispute between the ABCC and the Japanese midwives who were responsible Unbreathed Memories for much of the data collection on where dead babies should be sent to be cremated The midwives had already established a close locationor this task that was convenient however the ABCC ound another crematorium that was cheaper This issue Was One Of Many one of many of problems that were crossed in the ABCC in Japan The survival of the ABCC in Washington was constantly being subject to scrutiny due to its low potential or significant scientific discovery amongst the many observers The ABCC continued on mainly because of the idea that the data may not be clear at the time of collection but maybe in the Graduates in Wonderland: The International Misadventures of Two (Almost) Adults future it could be usedor some constructive purpose Eugene P Evans and Everett Pendergrass made this argument in their reports to the National Academy of Science in late 1948The last part in their reports to the National Academy of Science in late 1948The last part the book deals with the genetics data and its scientific analysis along with the updating of ABCC s story to the time of publication Chapters nine through eleven are laden with scientific jargon and A Sally Lockhart Mystery 2 focus on the nuts and bolts of the ABCC s work Chapter twelve tries toinish up the story by bringing the progression of the ABCC up to date In chapters nine through eleven Lindee laboriously explores the different definitions analyses public concerns and publications that were involved in the various studies conducted by the ABCC Defining what a mutation was a prime example of a problematic definition that the author spends an entire chapter investigating Mutations were divided into major and minor malformations however after the ABCC completed extensive research in the area no hard evidence could be used to concretely classify malformations thus the division of malformations were bas. S the I Love My Dad first comprehensive history of the ABCC's research on how radiation affected the survivors of the atomic bomb Arguing that Cold War politics and cultural valuesundamentally shaped the work of the ABCC M Susan Lindee tells the compelling story of a project that raised disturbing uestions about the ethical implications of using human subjects in scientific researchHow did the politics of the emerging Cold War affect the scientists' biomedical research and indings How did the ABCC document and publicly present the effects of radiation Why did the ABCC refuse to provide med. Suffering Made Real American Science and the Survivors at Hiroshima is a monograph that combines and synthesizes various elements of social political cultural and scientific histories in order to reveal a new monograph that combines and synthesizes various elements of social political cultural and scientific histories in order to reveal a new on a topic that has already been thoroughly investigated Susan M Lindee the author and an assistant professor in the Department of the History and Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania argues that there is no way to uantitatively understand the suffering of the survivors Rather she contends that the anguish that the atomic bomb blasts caused the survivors are very personal experiences that no amount of data collection scientific analysis or careful observation will ever ully express She attempts to make her argument using the example of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission or the ABCC which conducted a thorough study of the survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki starting in 1946The ABCC is the survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki starting in 1946The ABCC is the that is ocused upon throughout the book The Noni Speaks Up first part of the book deals with how the ABCC began Chapters two and three discuss the Joint Commission and the initialield survey that was carried out in 1946 Chapter Handbags and Gladrags four investigates the justificationor the genetics project The Joint Commission in chapter two refers to the collaboration between American and Japanese scientists and the large number of Japanese support staff that was reuired or the ABCC to operate The Joint Commission ended up being joint only on paper though since was reuired or the ABCC to operate The Joint Commission ended up being joint only on paper though since American scientists dominated the organization This was clearly demonstrated in how the Americans dealt with the Japanese scientists For example after completing only one our month ield study in 1946 the American scientists returned to the US and ceased any additional American studies or surveys in Hiroshima or Nagasaki Wish Upon a Wedding for ten months however they used information and specimens that Japanese scientists collected Further the Americans were reluctant to correspond and share their research with the Japanese Undeterred the Japanese continued their research in addition to the data collection they were conducting on the behalf of US researchers Some of the Japanese scientists concerns were validated by Philip Owen of the National Research Council in a memorandum released in 1950 which highlighted the Americans lack of collaboration with the Japanese Unfortunately nothing changed as an immediate result of acknowledging the problem The ABCC encountered numerous while executing theirieldwork There werecultural and language barriers resentment towards the Americans We Got the Neutron Bomb: The Untold Story of L.A. Punk for dropping the atomicbombs and logistical complications The ABCC s poor logistical support was exemplified in 1947 when they were allocated only two jeeps to complete the burdensome task of bringing all new mothers in Hiroshima to the ABCC clinic to draw blood during a time when civilian transportation was extremely The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945 unleashed aorce as mysterious as it was deadly radioactivity In 1946 the United States government created the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission ABCC to serve as a permanent agency in Japan with the official mission of studying the medical effects of radiation on the survivors The next ten years saw the ABCC's most intensive research on the genetic effects of radiation and up until 1974 the ABCC scientists published papers on the effects of radiation on aging life span ertility and disease Suffering Made Real .
Suffering Made Real American Science and the Survivors at Hiroshima